I'm a Future Teacher

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I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Tue Jan 20, 2015 10:43 pm

I mentioned before that I was attending college to become a teacher, but there are a few concerns I have that I'd like to bring up. I was wondering if anyone had any advice they could give me with regards to those concerns?
For one thing, the biggest concern is finding a job. I don't exactly live in the most job rich part of Virginia, but I don't really want to move either. I don't mind commuting, and hopefully Staunton would be the furthest I'd commute. At least where I live most places are within driving distance. A drive to Lexington takes about an hour, depending on which direction I go, a drive to school is about 45 minutes. (My School also happens to be near the dreaded "Bunnyman Bridge. I might just have to check it out one day haha!)
There's also a lot of complaints about Common Core and a lot of the teaching standards with regard to "SOLs" or "Standards of Learning." Because I went to Highschool in New York state and have been out for a little over 10 years now, will I be able to relate to and show empathy to my students? I think I will. Maybe I can bring a fresh new perspective to the learning environment. I don't plan to teach Math anyway, though I do find that I was already using aspects of common core in my head to do Math since the old way was always something I struggled with. Finding "friendly" numbers makes things so much easier for me.
Then there's my target grade level. Everyone seems to think that Middle School kids are the toughest, but that's the Grade level I want to teach: 7th and 8th grade. In my own experience that's when I had the best teachers in Grade school, and achieved the Honor roll for the first time. It's an interesting time period where kids change from child to adult. Personally I think I'd be intimidated by little-little kids because I'm not really used to them that young, and High School kids just want to hurry up and graduate.
I also wonder...even though I'm not religious myself...I still enjoy a lot of holidays like Christmas, Halloween, Easter, Valentine's, etc. and if I'd be able to incorporate holiday decorating into the classroom? Would I even have any control at all over what's taught? I heard Private Schools have more freedom, but I have never been to Private School. I've only ever been to Public Schools. People are so concerned about offending other people now...but I don't see why someone can't just opt out...no one is forcing someone to celebrate Christmas...or another holiday...why ruin it for people who do? I don't know...
Anyway...if anyone knows anything about teaching and can offer help and advice...it'd be much appreciated...
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Wed Jan 21, 2015 6:12 am

I may have to leave before I can finish responding but I'll say what I can now.

First, people do feel a calling to teach at particular grade levels. Most people don't like the early adolescent, middle-school age, but there are some teachers who especially love that age group. My husband started out with them and actually prefers them to high schoolers. He used to say that when they were younger, he could really have an influence on their lives. He says that with high school kids, he sometimes sees them making big mistakes that could ruin their lives, but they won't listen to him. I also recall the middle school band teacher who taught all three of my kids in 7th & 8th grade. One time, at a concert, he told the audience, "This is the best age to teach! The kids are so passionate, and they haven't yet gotten distracted with romance or jobs, etc." So if you feel drawn to teach that age group, I'd say, Go for it!

Don't worry a bit about any "generation gap" with the students. Yes, they will be different from your generation, but they don't expect or need you to be their peer. They need guidance and a different perspective.

Private schools do not pay as well as public schools do.

If you are not religious yourself, you will fit right in to the current social climate in public schools, where the order of the day is pretty much state-imposed atheism. It is the religious people who sometimes have trouble, not the secular ones.

If you have your own classroom you will be free to decorate it as your like, seasonally, but there is less holiday decor in 7th-12th grades than there is in elementary schools. Most upper-level classrooms decorate according to the subject matter that is being taught rather than the season of the year.

Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to break into teaching. Often you need to know someone. Perhaps if you get to the point of practice teaching and impress your mentors, you can get a foot in the door that way. I wish I could tell you otherwise, but that is the way it seems to work. Network, network, network.

I am not a fan of common core myself. I do not in general like the whole standardized testing model as the best way to evaluate teaching outcomes. However, at least for now, that is the way of the world.

Sorry to be so abrupt. I was just trying to respond to your points as efficiently as possible, since I have to run out the door soon.

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:47 pm

It's alright Murf. You can always come back to it later. :)

That is the age group I feel drawn to teaching the most. Perhaps it's because 7th and 8th grade were personally my best years throughout school. Plus I had a really awesome 8th grade English Teacher, who introduced me to creative writing, poetry, and the Writer's Ink Club. I hope to establish something like that when I become a teacher. I think kids could really use some good extracurricular activities. I'm a little excited (and nervous) to do my observations, but I'm really excited to actually teach something.

I'm not worried with Generational gaps per say, it's more the fact that I was taught in a New York School versus a Virginia school. I think most schools would encourage a wider gap between teachers and students anyway right? I'm pretty sure my old High School did, especially when I applied for a substitute teaching job back then. I was still in my early 20s at the time, and they didn't want me to be in the Highschool. I sadly never did get that job, but I did return to school after that. And I went back to school yet again. So my life is all about school, so why not become a teacher? Haha! I like this old saying about Karate classes, and while I haven't exactly taken Karate (the exception being briefly when I went to college the first time) no one is ever truly a "master" because when you receive a black belt, eventually it fades over time, resembling how we all started with a white belt. Without practice, the belt fades back to white. The same principle I believe applies to the teaching and even the school setting. It's a constant shift from being at the bottom to the top. People in 8th grade are at the top of the totem pole if you will because they are at the tail end of middle school, but fall back to the bottom when they become High School freshmen. When they go to college after graduating from Highschool, the same thing happens again. For me the subjects I'm passionate about are Creative Writing and Literature, and the Arts (including visual arts like drawing and painting and such.) I'm more likely to get a job teaching Creative writing, Literature and English though I think. Although the most demand is for teachers of the subject I am scared of: Math. :lol: Although I did surprisingly well in Math for the Liberal Arts.

I'm not crazy about standardized testing for sure. But as far as Common Core Mathematics goes, I was surprised when the methods that I used to help me gain a better understanding of Math were being applied to Common core. Why not give the kids a choice instead of forcing one way or the other? The "Old Fashioned way" didn't work for me, but the new way did. For some kids, it might be the opposite. Every kid is going to have their own individual learning style. I think the emphasis should be on actual learning, not trying to memorize information. Whenever I tried to memorize stuff I always forgot half of it, and to this day I don't remember much of it. But when you apply your knowledge, and find ways to actually make it relatable and interesting, that's when you remember it. I want to teach kids stuff that they'll use and remember even when they go to college or go off to find a job in the work force. Not just try to get through the test.

I'm hoping I can build networks through the college professors I meet, and the fact that I am getting such good grades there. Last semester I got Straight As. I'm not expecting that to happen each time, but I do hope to at least earn a great Grade Point Average and get As and Bs. One of my Professors also teaches Science at the High School near the College. I'm hoping she'll put in a good word for me. The Mary Baldwin college rep said it would be likely that I'd get my job where I'd do my student teaching. Even if it's in Staunton, it would be a start. It would be quite a drive every day though. I'm not 100% sure about Mary Baldwin, I still want to do some research I decided before I settle into which college I want to transfer to. Mary Baldwin does sound like a nice college, they even seem to say they help students find a job. But what I want to know is...is their "help" actually just the typical resume and cover letter writing, or is there actual resources and job placement with that college? Are there schools with agreements to hire Teaching students out of college? These are going to be the major determining factors for me picking my Four Year school. I want one that will help with job placement and resources and not just tell me how many things I've done wrong with my resume and point me to indeed.com or some other job search website. Genesee Community College promised to help me find work, their promise just ended up being like what happened when I went to Alfred State, virtually no help at all. What resources are good for picking the right four year school? I have to be able to get in with Grants and Scholarships, I really can't afford more loans.

I think there are some secular Private schools from what I have heard. I'm not even sure if there are any around here. Lexington City school I heard was pretty good though. I may not be religious, but I don't necessarily think I agree with "state imposed atheism." To be honest, I don't think that's really fair for anyone. Sure I'm not a Christian, nor do I believe in the Christian God, but I think children do have the right to read their Bibles and pray in schools. I personally would not be offended by it or want to attempt to stop them. If it means my job is on the line...then I'd have to choose between what I feel is a moral obligation and the law. My personal beliefs and moral obligation tell me that I should respect any and all beliefs, and let people be free to believe what they want as long as it's not harming anyone. Prayer and reading the Bible don't really hurt anyone even if I personally don't do either. I even have a Bible that belonged to my Great Grandfather. It's not that I read it or anything, I just keep it as a keepsake to remember him by. Instead of imposing Atheism, Christianity, or another religion, I'd rather teach kids to think critically about what they believe and have them come to their own logical conclusions. I do want to be free to decorate, and have freedom on what books I can choose and have some control over the curriculum. I'm afraid Public schools wouldn't offer those opportunities, everything would be state mandated and regulated. On the other hand, State regulated Public schools would have better pay and benefits. I'm also afraid of the stories I've heard where the parents are less likely to care when kids are in Public school. But whether the parents care or not, I want my students to know that I care, and I'm there for them. I will see them as my kids when they are sitting in my classroom. I want learning to be fun, but I also want kids to make sure they respect the rules. I do not want to be an overly strict, or overly "easy" teacher. I want a balanced classroom.

Even if it's Middle School I still want to decorate. Maybe I can incorporate holiday themed stories (something spooky for Halloween, maybe something winter or Christmas themed for Christmas) maybe display some books or challenge people to write about their own Christmas traditions, or if they don't celebrate Christmas what their holiday traditions are, if any. This may be a good time to learn about holidays in other cultures too. If they don't celebrate, perhaps they could write about something else. Either way, I want to be fair to everyone. Regardless, I do want to have good literary perspectives. The challenging part is going to be those Essays. I didn't find them fun when I was that age, and I doubt they will either. I did find compare/contrast essays interesting though. I wonder if I can challenge my kids to pick a book and compare it with a movie or video game (a lot of video games now a days have complex and indepth plots that might be interesting to write about). Maybe write about a topic they feel passionate about. Whichever the case, I want them to enjoy the learning experience, and not just think of it as work or that they "have to be there." I want them to know that learning is a privilege. So many have had to fight just for the right to be in school back in the past, now a days it feels like the passion to learn isn't there. It's more like a chore.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Thu Jan 22, 2015 5:40 am

It sounds to me like you'd make a wonderful teacher, Mau!

There are for sure a lot of English teachers out there. Sometimes it is helpful if you can combine that with something else. Can you teach a foreign language, or coach a sport? School systems love "two-fers."

I recall that MBC had a career center, but I don't know if it helps very actively in placing people or not. That might also depend on who is running it now. My husband, who already had an undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt, took all his education courses there and got a job right away, but I don't think that is typical, truthfully. He was also a veteran, which might have helped a little. I've forgotten the name of the woman who used to be over the education dept. there. Patty Westhaver, maybe? I recall she gave him some good advice about that standardized teaching exam all teachers have to pass. It was multiple choice, and she told him to choose whichever answer sounded like it was most student-friendly. He did that and either scored perfectly or missed one or two--and he hadn't even started his course work yet!

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Thu Jan 22, 2015 12:22 pm

Thanks for your support Murf, I appreciate it! :)

Hmmm...I have heard about that before. I'd probably have to brush up on my Spanish. I don't know enough about sports to be a coach. Maybe I could teach Biology, I seem to be doing well in that subject (aside from figuring out how to use a microscope! I'm good at the book work aspect of it though.) My concerns with Teaching Biology are the fear that parents will get after me if I teach them specific subject matters within Biology. I'm not just talking about Evolution either. If I can find a way to make it fun and exciting, I'd probably enjoy teaching History too.

I might just have to visit their college then and find out, and see if I can't research other colleges and their "helpful" methods. I may talk to some people on campus here too. On campus they sort of encourage this program called the "Virginia Education Wizard" but...I don't like it one bit. :lol: I took a simple personality test on there and the results were completely off the wall and had very little to nothing to do with teaching.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Fri Jan 23, 2015 5:57 am

Combining Biology with English would be most unusual, but if you can get yourself certified in both fields, go for it.

I don't think all coaches have to be tremendously knowledgeable about sports. Some women coach dance teams. My daughter's high school even has a bowling team. I mean, ideally, the people who coach those things ought to have some experience and be good at it, but I think often times, in the less prestigious sports, they just want a warm body to sponsor them, and the coaches sometimes learn on the job.

By all means, explore the options in your area. College is a big investment, not only of money but also of time, and you know what your goals are, which is more than half the battle. Just think about how many freshmen start college having no idea what they want to study!

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:52 pm

I sort of like being the odd one out. When you think about it though, a lot of different subjects tend to interconnect and relate to each other. History relates to Biology in a few ways because my History Text book talks about homo erectus and the Neanderthals, the former being a possible ancestor to humans and the latter one of our closest biological relatives. There were sadly, other hominid species that have died off. Written language, including English relates to History and Biology, without it we couldn't have learned about History, Biology or even Math for that matter. We wouldn't have those pesky word problems either (If a train goes at a hundred miles an hour....). History tells us about how language developed, Biology tells us the story of how spoken language and the brain skills to comprehend language both written and spoken are developed. Formulas in Math are often applied to certain rates in Science, including Biology. Even Art is important, because it's this form of expression that I think was in a way, the earliest form of written language. Cave paintings on the wall would have communicated stories, culture and traditions in our ancient ancestors. Today, art can be interpreted is one is well studied in psychology, and it's a way of bringing out the subconscious thoughts one might have harbored. That's something I have noticed and made various connections to during my time at Dabney, and I think this is a lesson I'd like to apply in my schooling, that each subject is important. Music is also important, since it's part of our lives and communicates feelings and is classified as an audio kind of art. Music can be used to tell a story, or enhance a story being told.

I have heard that I could get certified in different subject areas, even if my college major was in English. I certainly want English to be my primary subject, but I'd be open to other subject areas. I'm somewhat dreading the idea of teaching Math though, maybe it wouldn't be...too bad. Those word problems though...:lol:

I'd have to consider it. I think I'd rather organize a club though than a sport, but clubs are typically voluntary aren't they? I'd love to start my own version of "Writer's Ink" in the school district I teach at. Writer's Ink was a club where we shared our own poetry, short stories, sometimes essays, recommended things to read, and we had a student published book.

I've been there Murf. I've explored a lot of career options in my life. To be honest, the first time I went to college back when I was 18, I really don't think I was ready. I do want one where I can definitely find a real career and not just a cash register type of job. I know what my goals are, I'm just not clear how to get there. Guess I'll have to speak to a career coach at some point, they might be able to help with that.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:27 am

I spoke about this thread to my husband this weekend. He suggested that you look into certifying as special ed, or teaching English as a Foreign Language, for your "two-fer," especially if you want to teach middle school.

My husband is special ed and teaches gifted kids exclusively. In many places "Gifted" falls under special ed. Just a thought.

What you are saying about the interconnectedness of subjects reminds me of Gardiner's book Frames of Mind, which I am sure you will hear about if you haven't already. In that, his first book on the subject, he identified seven specific areas of intelligence--Language, which shades into Music (because both are aural); then Music shades into Math (because Music is a mathematical system); Math shades into Art (because Geometry is spatial); Art shades into Kinesthetic learning (because artists, like athletes, have to be aware of bodies in space); Kinesthesia shades into Inter-personal Intelligence (because we read each other's body language); and knowledge of other people, Interpersonal Intelligence, helps us know ourselves (Intrapersonal Intelligence). Of course, the only way anyone else ever knows we understand ourselves is through our Language, so it comes full circle.

Gardiner has refined this theory over the years and has added some areas of intelligence to it, I believe. He says that academic learning is set up to identify and refine Language and Math, but doesn't do a very good job of identifying and developing the many other types of intelligence, which is why people with high I.Q.s (meaning they are high on the Language/Math scale) don't always turn out to be the most successful ones in life.

He recommends that students identify the areas of their weakness and try to balance those out. Unfortunately, when applied to the public school system, this has too often translated into making people learn subjects in ways that are inappropriate--making people dance to learn a novel, or draw pictures of it, etc. That's not really what Gardiner meant. Of course, some people respond more to Art or Movement than they do to the written word, but what he really meant was, if you are primarily a written word kind of person, make sure you get some athletic learning going--or if you are really good in sports, try to cultivate your weakness in math, that sort of thing. It's kind of stupid to try to approach a verbal art like literature in every way except the verbal way, IMO.

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:14 pm

It might not be a bad idea for me to look into it Murf. I never knew Special Ed was also for gifted students. I always thought that fell under the jurisdiction of "Advanced learning". I was never smart enough to go for Advanced learning when I was a kid. Back in the day, I was probably around average or slightly below. Pressure to fit in, and High School drama I think held me back a lot. Getting away from that setting, and attending Dabney, I got Straight As the first Semester and was invited to join Phi Theta Kappa. I was invited to that when I went to GCC I think, but never went for it, I was just too busy. I wish I had, but now I can and I heard it's good for helping me get scholarships.

Students do have their own learning styles and that's something I need to keep in mind. Either that or I could brush up on my Spanish. I might look into more information about the laws of teaching in other states as well, since I'm not very far from the West Virginia border. Most states I think have their own licensing requirements. Another option I think is seeing if they offer the opportunity to teach online: I think I would love teaching kids online. But it doesn't really matter to me. A lot of kids make use of the internet these days anyway and are pretty tech-savvy.

It sounds like a good read. I have heard of different types of intelligence, and I like the idea that each subject shades into the other. I don't even think we're limited to the kinds of intelligence that are talked about. There may be more we just haven't discovered yet. I think one is actually being able to find your way through the woods without getting lost.

Well my areas of weakness definitely include Math. Even though I enjoy doing Art, my weakness is probably perspective, and anatomy. But Art is supposed to be a form of expression in my opinion. I think I'd have fun teaching art if I thought there was a huge job market for it. It figures my weakest subject is where most of the jobs are. I think it's a good idea to try different approaches to different subject matters, but reading still requires reading. Perhaps acting out the characters in the book could help people get a better feel for the characters and emotions in the book though and what the author is trying to convey. It's still reading the story, but doing so in such a way that you make the book more interactive. I think that falls more into adapting different learning styles though, not intelligence types. Audio, Visual and Kinesthetic I think are the three learning types. I often find that if I'm given a task, being walked through it step by step and being able to try it helps me learn it best. So I think I'm somewhat kinesthetic. But I do use aspects of audio and visual learning as well. Taking notes always helps even if you don't study them, because actively taking notes means you're challenging your brain to put it into paper, and may remember what it was better by actively writing them down. I want to make sure I can recognize each child's needs and be able to approach the subject matter accordingly. That can be challenging, since each classroom is full of different personalities.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Thu Jan 29, 2015 5:42 am

Letting yourself get distracted by high school drama back in the day doesn't mean you weren't gifted, j/s. Gifted kids don't always make top grades, which is one of the reasons why they are addressed in special ed. Sometimes being gifted means they are especially sensitive to other people, to difficult situations, etc. Their giftedness can actually get in the way of their doing well in school. All three of mine were classified "gifted" under the TN rubric, and the eldest and youngest have been the stereotypical super-bright kids. But my middle son was sort of a slacker in high school, although he has done very well in college. He has been confiding to me lately that he was reacting to social stuff in high school, some of it stuff I didn't even know about at the time. You know, crushes on girls who dissed him, that sort of thing.

Most states have reciprocity with the teaching certificates of neighboring states, but by all means, look into it. My husband was originally licensed in VA, and he had no problem converting that to a TN license after we moved here. And while you're about it--look into the special ed laws and see if VA classifies giftedness as a disability. My husband didn't get into special ed until several years after he had been working here, so I don't know.

RE the job market for art--there actually is a good market for commercial art, I think.

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Thu Jan 29, 2015 12:48 pm

I think when I was a teenager I wanted to be loved and accepted, and "fit in." I wanted friends. I wanted to have a boyfriend. I know I have anxiety, and tend to be a bit socially awkward. In Middle School I got shoved a lot by this girl who was a right bully, not just to me but to other students as well. I think I was one of her "favorite victims" though as she picked on me a lot and said the most obnoxious things. I was afraid fighting back would land me in trouble, but I admit I did shove her back once, and I told her that I felt she picked on me because she felt empty inside and had low self esteem. She left me alone for the rest of the day, the next day going back into the same old shoving routine. Peer Mediation didn't work. The one time I stood up to her was when she was threatening a friend of mine who was younger than me, I guess you can say that when I'm defending someone my courage goes up a billion-fold even though I was still scared. In High School she didn't bully me as much, I don't remember being shoved around by her in HighSchool that I remember, especially since I started hanging out with my Spanish Teacher a lot. She didn't dare pick on me when a teacher was around! I kept begging my Spanish teacher to teach me Karate (She knew Karate which I thought was the coolest thing in the world back then). Working in groups especially made even the most pleasant subjects that I loved a little unpleasant, especially if there wasn't a friend to work with, or if that friend had other friends they'd rather work with. If I presented an idea in a group, nine times out of ten it was shot down. I often sat there and felt stupid because I didn't know what to do, and they wouldn't let me help. I had trouble speaking when other people were talking in a group, I felt like I couldn't get a single word in, and a friend in High School told me I should "include myself" and she didn't realize how difficult of a struggle that was for me. I also fell into depression and anger. I hated school, and often hated myself. I felt like I wasn't good enough and I kept comparing myself with that friend. Eventually we had a devastating falling out which, when you have very few friends losing one is like the end of the world. Such are the woes of High School teen-hood. Trouble is, that baggage carried over into College, and things got worse for me there and beyond. I had relationship problems left and right. I'd had my heart broken more than once. I made a few bad mistakes I still regret to this day and it's been almost 10 years. Things didn't start to get better for me until I met my boyfriend. It didn't help at all that my Step Dad would not let me have a cat even though I so desperately wanted one after my cat Buddy died. Buddy was the last surviving thing of my childhood I think before my parents divorced, and was a source of comfort for me. I loved that cat. I sort of took up to collecting fake cats because I couldn't have a real one. Now I think I've got way too many plush cats. Haha!

Now I live with my boyfriend who is loving and accepting of all of my little quirks. We have three beautiful cats, all with different personalities. I wish I could have taken my cat Mini with me from New York, but she's getting up in years, and has a good home loving home with my Grandma. She'd always lived there, so taking her for a 9-12 hour drive South would probably traumatize her. After she put the other two cats down due to serious health problems and the fact they were in a lot of pain and really old by this point, now Mini is the only cat Grandma has, and is good company to her. I try to tell myself I made the right decision. Besides, I later adopted Talos wanting my own cat, and my boyfriend had Storm. The neighbors gave us Nova, the hyper active kitten. I still struggle with emotional issues and anxiety, but I'm not nearly as bad as I was as a teenager, and I've been trying to conquer it and work through it, even if it's just taking me baby steps to do so. Oddly enough I think I feel OK with standing in front of a classroom. Speech class helped with that I think, plus doing that practice presentation in Biology. I got Straight As my first Semester. I'm eagerly awaiting my class room observation time.

Oh gosh Murf I turned this from a teaching thread into "Let's tell Mau's life story" thread. ^^; Anyway....

What exactly does it mean to be gifted? I know I get destracted pretty easily, but I'm also inspired on a whim and if I don't immediately act on that inspiration I either go crazy or forget the thing that inspired me. This is what often happens when I'm trying to write my book!

I was reading there was repiprocity with West Virginia, I just wasn't sure how that worked. I wonder if there's any special "taxes" that occur if I work in West Virginia but live in Virginia? I'll probably pursue that if I can't find a job around here. I'm not letting any door close, I'm keeping all of my options going. I'd still like to teach English though, but I'll consider it as an option anyway.

The job market for art teachers, I'm not sure about around here though. That's something I'd have to look into. Clifton Forge has a school for the arts however.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Fri Jan 30, 2015 5:58 am

Oh, I experienced some bullying in middle school, too, although it sounds like what you went through was worse. The girl who was the ring-leader of it I saw a few years later during a summer session at college. She was smaller than I was after we were adults (in middle school she had been taller than I was), and she looked miserable. I overheard some people talking about her in the restroom, talking like they found her really unpleasant. I realized then that she had plenty of problems of her own, and I was able to let go of whatever she had tried to do to me. Absolutely no one who bullies another feels good about himself. People who are feeling good about themselves don't do stuff like that.

I think each state defines giftedness a little differently, or has different ways of assessing it. One way is the I.Q. test, but cut-offs for it vary from one place to another. I think around here, people can get into the program with I.Q.s as low as 118, if they have other indicators. There are checklists given to teachers and to parents that ask questions about the child's habits and behaviors. And I believe there is also a creativity component. It takes certain combinations of qualities to make the cut, but I think a really high I.Q. (like above 130) will be automatic.

One indicator would be an obsession with a particular interest or hobby. I'm not talking video games, but more like an obsession with making origami (my daughter's go-to hobby), or with investigating chemistry, or doing math (my older son's field). My middle son, the one who was not so academic in high school, used to neglect his school work to write poetry. A keen sense of justice can be one indicator, too. For example, your standing up for younger students who were being bullied would suggest that you have a keen sense of justice.

When I spoke about commercial art being a good field, I wasn't necessarily talking about teaching art, but rather using art in business. Creating print ads, or designing the patterns for fabric, stuff like that. Of course, somebody has to teach that stuff, too, but I'm just saying, there are more uses for art than self-expression.

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby MauEvig » Fri Jan 30, 2015 3:46 pm

I agree. Seems like every kid in school goes through some rough times in their life at some point. I'm sorry you had to go through that. But you're right, they don't and that's why I think it's important for both parties to learn to feel good about themselves and build their self esteem. In my opinion, both the bully and the victim should receive counseling, because if only the victim does, it's not really going to solve the problem in the long run. So I'm a bit critical of how "Stopbullying.gov" addresses the bully. They recommend the victim get counseling, but I feel like that singles them out and makes them think they have a mental illness. Really, it's possible the bully could have a mental illness or could be bullied themselves for some reason. I also disagree that there shouldn't be a "zero tolerance" for bullying behavior. I will pull them aside and talk to them myself first, and if that doesn't work then I'll send them to the principal's office.

It's possible, but I'm not sure. I think it's likely I could have ADD (I don't really like adding the "H" to make it ADHD since I don't consider myself all that hyperactive) but who knows. I'd say my I.Q. is probably about average, but I don't know. If I am Gifted as you say, I hope that wouldn't impede on my ability to be a good teacher. I do see myself as a bit of an eccentric though. I do have a particular interest in cats to the point of obsession I think. What's my favorite part of Halloween? The Black Cats. What do I immediately go to when I go to the Zoo? The Wild Cats. I tend to collect things with cats on them, most of my art is centered around cats, my original character is an anthro cat, I tend to play cat-like characters in video games, my stories tend to involve anthro cats or talking cats of some kind, if there's a subject about cat species it immediately peaks my interest, if I can learn one word in any language it's how they say the word "cat" and I'm not just obsessed with domestic cats either, I love wild cats and I tend to know more about cats than most average people do. Even my jacket has cats on it. I take "crazy cat lady" as a compliment. My internet screen name "Mau" means cat in Egyptian and it also refers to a Cat breed. I love Egyptian culture for the fact that they worshiped cats, have cat goddesses like Sekhmet and Bastet, and they were also one of the most gender neutral societies in ancient times. They actually respected and revered women more than many other cultures of that day. I could literally go on and on and on about cats, what my cats are like, and if I meet a fellow cat-lover we could probably spend hours talking about our cats. I will also note that before my Grandpa died I was always a little intimidated by him, but he did his best to connect with his grandchildren, and when he would talk about his cats it felt like it was his way of showing his love for us. Also I pitch a fit if holidays like Christmas or Valentine's day have plush animals of every single animal except for a cat. If someone hates cats, I tend to go on the defensive. It's also shaped how I advocate for certain stances like Trap Neuter Return. I try to educate people that cats aren't evil and that they make great companions. I'm saddened when someone says they're allergic. I know it's not their fault, or the cat's fault. Technically I'm allergic, but they really don't bother me. I guess I have desensitized myself to cats. The fact that human beings share 90% of our DNA in common with cats is beautiful to me. That means we're related somewhere down the line. :)

Someone did say I should be a Graphic designer. I like art to express myself though. I don't think there are any jobs around here that offer that unless I work exclusively over the internet. Still, I think I've chosen a good career path. At least I hope so.
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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Murfreesboro » Sun Feb 01, 2015 5:54 am

Oh, I think you'll make a fine teacher. And I agree with you that bullies as well as the bullied need counseling of some sort.

Your love of cats is certainly profound! I was raised with dogs, not cats, and for most of my life considered myself a dog person. However, in our current location (a very busy street), we keep taking cats in to keep them from getting killed by passing cars. We currently own three. Dogs don't run loose around here. I have learned that I can love cats every bit as much as dogs, although they are quite different animals. I have decided I am simply an animal person.

I didn't know that the ancient Egyptians were more gender-neutral than other societies of their time. Of course, I did know there was that one woman pharaoh, I forget her name--but she wore a fake beard or something to symbolize power.

Funny memory--several years ago, our family went to an exhibitions of Egyptian tomb art which was held at the Frist Art Museum in downtown Nashville. Lots of mummies and stuff, including some of cats. Well, my daughter totally freaked out (she was about 9 then). She said that she was freaked out by how many gods they had. I said, "But you knew about polytheism from school, how the Greeks and Romans had so many gods & goddesses." She said, "Yes, but theirs looked like people. These were part human, part animal." She is my artistic kid, the one who is always drawing and making origami. She is very visually sensitive. She was totally freaked by the grotesquerie of the Egyptian gods.

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Re: I'm a Future Teacher

Postby Andybev01 » Sun Feb 01, 2015 6:39 pm

There is a museum in San Jose run by the Rosecrucians that you two would like.

Lots of Egyptian artifacts, human & animal mummies, a neat mock-up of a tomb.
All you that doth my grave pass by,
As you are now so once was I,
As I am now so you must be,
Prepare for death & follow me.


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